Tag: harm reduction

The 13th National Harm Reduction Conference

The 2022 National Harm Reduction Conference comes at a time when harm reduction, health care, and drug policy reform have entered a dynamic and critical phase. The prescription opioid and heroin overdose epidemic has captured national attention, with renewed focus on transmission of HIV and viral hepatitis among people who use drugs. These trends are reshaping the policy and public health landscapes, making harm reduction more urgent and relevant than ever before.

The biennial event is the only conference of its kind in the United States. For four days, some of the most creative minds from the U.S. and abroad come together to address a myriad of complex issues facing the harm reduction movement. A diverse community of people who use drugs, social justice activists, service providers, healthcare workers, researchers, policymakers, public health officials, and law enforcement— all coming together to put an end to the harms and injustices caused by the War on Drugs.

Prevention Meets Harm Reduction: How Community Collaborations Work Across the Continuum, Part 1

How can prevention coalitions work across the continuum of care to maximize impact and sustain systems-level changes that promote wellness for everyone? This virtual series will provide a framework for understanding harm reduction strategies by sharing the history and pillars of harm reduction as a social movement and examples of various types of harm reduction strategies. Participants will explore how the goals and values of prevention intersect with harm reduction and how we can work together through community collaborations to address overlapping goals. Finally, we will explore how the knowledge brought from those with lived experience can enhance our implementation strategies across the continuum of care.

Meeting Them Where They’re At: Harm Reduction and Positive Youth Development

Join us on Tuesday, June 28th from 9:30 am-12:30 pm for a FREE, peer learning summit focused on Harm Reduction and Positive Youth Development. During this summit, we will bring together service providers working with youth, young adults, and other people who use drugs to consider strategies to mitigate overdose risk for young people, methods of combining harm reduction and positive youth development approaches, and much more!

National Harm Reduction Technical Assistance Center Information Session

The National Harm Reduction Technical Assistance (TA) Center provides free help to anyone in the country providing harm reduction services – or even those planning to provide services. The TA Center is a resource for everyone, including organizations such as syringe services programs, health departments, and substance use disorder treatment, prevention, and recovery programs.

Mental Health & Substance Use SIG

We would like to invite all NASW members dedicated to Harm Reduction, Housing First, Social Justice and the dignity and worth of all people to collaborate in strengths-based advocacy and action guided by evidence, lived experience and the neurobiological impact of attachment & trauma on substance use and mental health, to create meaningful and socially just change in the realms of Mental Health and Substance Use for social work clients, students, and practitioner’s in Massachusetts.

The Keys to Low-Threshold Housing

Please join the RIZE Massachusetts Foundation, the National Harm Reduction Coalition, and the Kraft Center for Community Health at MGH, for the second in a series of learning communities focused on safe housing and harm reduction practices. For this second learning community, The Keys to Low-Threshold Housing, we will hear from peers across the country about partnerships and approaches they have developed to save lives and keep people housed.

Laura Guzman, JD, of The DOPE Project and Andrew Spiers, LSW, of Pathways to Housing, will participate in a discussion moderated by Emma Roberts of the National Harm Reduction Coalition. They will share replicable best practices focused on person-centered approaches that build trust and autonomy, with an emphasis on how best to support people who use drugs. They will also address topics raised by learning community participants.

Participants in this 2-hour event will:

· Learn replicable best practices for low-threshold housing

· Explore how to identify and foster the right partners and approaches for deeper collaboration between harm reduction and housing programs

· Learn about resident rights and explore opportunities for harm reduction

We hope you can join us for The Keys to Low-Threshold Housing, which will explore how harm reduction and housing providers can partner to better serve people with substance use disorders.

Housing as Harm Reduction: Exploring Models to Support People Who Use Drugs

Register for our free peer learning summit! We will bring together service providers, treatment providers, housing and homeless providers, and others working at the intersection of housing and substance use, to reflect and learn about strategies to support populations who are unhoused and/or using drugs. Through keynote presentations and small breakout presentations, we will spend our time together processing and learning about housing first models, approaches to addressing chronic homelessness, and thinking critically about sustainable models that can lead to long-term housing for people who use drugs.

This summit will take place on Zoom Wednesday, March 30th from 9:30am-12:30pm. Please feel free to contact us with any questions at [email protected]

Supporting People Who Use Drugs: Strategies for Service Providers

Many service providers are likely interacting with people who use drugs and/or people who are at risk for overdose. Being able to effectively support and engage with people who use drugs (PWUD) is vital in our work if we want to help keep our clients and participants safe from overdose and other adverse health effects.  Collectively, there is a lack of comprehensive training on how we can effectively support this population, while being nonjudgmental and non-stigmatizing in our approach. This training will offer participants an opportunity to explore reasons why people may use drugs, how we can assess risk using the “drug, set, setting” model, and how we can design our physical program spaces to support engagement among our participants and clients who use drugs.